Skip to main content

About your Search

20121224
20130101
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 259 (some duplicates have been removed)
open, don't operate electric switches that will cause a spark. don't use your cell phone. use the cell phone outside or a neighbor's phone to call 911. get everyone out of the building, close the gas valve and forget it. don't open it up again. there is probably a leak and you will have troubles wait for pg and e to test it. what's the most important thing in an emergency? everyday, water. somewhere in front of the house you will see these. san francisco water department. how do you get in here? easy. a long screwdriver or pry bar. pull it this way and the whole thing will lift out. even if it's crusty you can get it out. that's what it looks like. that's brass covered water meter. there it is. how would you tell if water was leaking if the building without going in there? that thing woulding pegged. this guy would be spinning. here's how you shut it on and off. like the gas thing, the valve thing with the square head. there are a couple of ears. you lineup the 2 ears. there is a hole to put a padlock. if it's on ita in direction of the /phroe. flow. when it's off, these 2 lineup. the
we use this. a silly puddy you put on if you have things of value you don't want breaking in an earthquake, grab this. all hardware stores have them. anybody have this at home? >> this is, why is this a hazard aside from it being in an earthquake? most of the home it is built in the city before the 1850's was meant for one socket not for a stereo and everything plugged into it it was meant for one item. hazardous material. this draino and different things, read the labels. it's important to know what you have in the home in case somebody injest it. make sure you know what you have so you don't cross contaminate. you don't want to put bleach next to ammonia. in a disaster if /taeu break and mix, what will happen. you will have a hazardous material place in your house. how about this? the typical garage. most people don't have gas in the suburbs you do. if you have lawn mowers. store it low. gas fumes will creep down to the bottom. if you have to store gas, store it mostly full. if you have an empty gas container -- if you want to protect yourself put cords across it so it
and creamery by going to buy right market.com. and don't forget to check out our blog for more info on many of our episodes at sf quick bites.com. until next time, may the fork be with you. ♪ ♪ >> so chocolaty. mm. ♪ >> oh, this is awesome. oh, sorry. i thought we were done rolling. ♪ ♪ >> started in 1990. the citizens of the marina district came to the fire department and asked for a program to survive for 3 days. there is a 70 percent chance we will have a 6.5 earthquake. 71 large fires. 40 major rescue operations. [inaudible]. rescue operations there were 34 structure fires we need 275 engines to handle this. we have 41. you will be on your own and we should be prepared. we will go over the merge training program. part of the training program is helping you make the decisions that will save lives. in this situation this person carrying a pail of water to put out the fire will not put out the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to
before you enter a room feel the door with the back of your hand. if it's hot and you don't see smoke, open it slowly, take a look inside, you know if it's a small fire and you can put it out, do it. work in pairs. the second person is your back up. if the fire is too big, close the door and get help. have 2 emergency exits if you can. there is a fire escape there and the stairway we came up, there's your 2 exists. you seen these before? the hose cabinets. there is a fire extinguisher in there, 50 feet of hose. a nozzle and water in there you can turn it on. don't do what he's doing. if you turn this on you will have a pile of spaghetti with hose. one person take the hose out to where you are going to put the fire out. tonight open the door, yet and have the other person turn the water on. if you don't feel comfortable, get out. keep yourself safe. we have gauze. this is made of cotton. what class of fire is that? a. >> we have some fire. we have air. we have heat. we have a fire going. if i went in like that what did i just do? >> smoth erred it. simple; right . remember the
, and if they don't know how to put words to that, they don't know how to begin to solve the problems or ask for help and this is at the very fundamental level which we teach very, very young children. they have the do -- domains and compassion and we heard bullying is a problem with relationships and a lot of researchers talk about it like this as well. this is where we learn about having positive relationships that make a difference between peer to peer in the schools that make a difference between adults and the children in the schools and for people not just in school but i am sure all of you can look up here and in each of the domains think of something in all of them in the last 24 hours that you had to use, that you had to activate in relationships with the co-workers or spouses and these are different life skills and there is the area of responsible decision making and comes into play when you have to figure out what to do when you have a problem, so you can probably just look at that and "oh yes, i see where the connections would be" and i would like to kind of point out because w
of the teacher. one of the teachers said i don't know what to do about this bullying thing because the kids are cussing me out in the hallway and all i can do is write them up. i think that's a moment i'd like us to think about in terms of empowerment of the teacher. it might be the case that the teacher doesn't feel for a lot of different reasons that she can't depend on his principal to back her up and maybe that principal their best, too. but one of the things i want us it look at in terms of treating children with dignity, which means they are worthy, two things. respect as a word is overused in schools and if i could frankly take down all of the banners of in schools that say you have to respect yourselves, i would. because i think that kids see that and they think that what we do is put up banners that do not sometimes reflect the way we treat each other underneath those banners. they are so conditioned you are just giving mae a slogan. so i think we naed to own the way in which respect is used in our cull taur and to say to young people, this is what it looks like it me when we w
protection. gloves, eye protection, and masks and sanitation and hand washing and who among us don't have a nick or a cut on their hand and are you going to touch someone's blood and your in tac skin will protect you from most ilknows. however, if you have a cut on your hand you have a path for infection to get inside of you and you want a pair of latex gloves -- several pairs of glo gloves that you can put on and change as you go from patient t patient hopefully and at least wash your hands and disinfect your hands between patient contacts and the eyes are like an open wound and path to get into your body and glasses and take the old glasses and throw them in your kit and you have something to wear and face mask and of course dust and dirt and all of these disasters throw up dust and dirt and especially in a dryer season and push comes t shove a band da bandana. and after a disaster is not the time to let your hygiene slip and it's a time to tighten it u and communitycable diseases and if it's wet and not yours don't touch it. gloves and every patient contac and don't touch blood and it'
to be the audience. oddly enough, they don't get that in the jails and prisons as a joke, really. they don't, i have been sober 23 years and incarcerated in a lot of the 1980's -- [applause] >> thanks, listen, i hope some day we reach a point where that's not necessary to applaud for. i really do. 23 years sober means that i have run out of excuses to misbehave. that's all it means. i'm criminal by nature. i'm challenged by generically designed. i'm a comedian by trade. i love the effort that it takes to make this disease, alcoholism addiction co-dependency, the trifecta of dysfunction that comes from a family source that's really nothing to make fun of. i make a living during humor about a disease that kills more people than car accidents, cancer and war combined, over 92% of incarcerated individuals have a drug or alcohol history or a thread in their family. i'm one of those kids, oldest of five kids in a very dysfunctional family. a.d.d. in our house stood for all different dads. [laughter] >> normal people don't laugh at that at all. they don't laugh at that at all. i get a huge response from th
for himself, i just wanted to cringe. >> what's clear is when dad said if you don't make a stop, this could happen to your little sister. then the sister gets in on it and it's, like, just puts the, as sisters will do, but i think as a, as someone who was a boy and had difficult conversations with my dad, i really really remember that sort of punch them, make it go away. a lot of families will give that advice. i'm not even convinced that's the wrong advice, the problem is when they doesn't work, then they shut down and quit coming to you because they are afraid it's a double disappointment. they can't please their peers and find friendship and then they so don't want to lose their fathers as well, this boy-father thing is so deep. >> every single person in this room wants to start making a difference. we want to start doing it right now. ros, how do you start giving a child the dignity that was taken away? >> i'm actually going to use an example that might seem a little far-flung for that question. one of the things i wanted to talk about with colleagues is the write up process when
environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around that and then use the plastic just as the thing
-- and this is my initiative and if you don't do the right thing you don't look like what know what you're doing and that isn't cool and you didn't do your job that well, if we get in these ambassador programs and give them training and rigor and how difficult that moment can be you can transform a school because of the power of kids talking to each other. >> all right. do we have another question? >> i appreciate that point you have been making. been, wooing with the board and the foundation and launch the student advisory board and i think we need to get that training kicked in really fast and that's a point well taken, and i appreciate lee you showing that clip because it illustrates an important distinction that we need to make. we don't want to send the message to america that bullying is normative; that bullying is normal, and that clip illustrated that the school is sending that message, and there is a difference, an important distinction between the school sort of embodying and sending the message to the kids that bullying is just a part of growing up and believing that bullying in ou
of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people each. putting out the fires. you will go into a dark room and doing a search. you will be treating people
on the block and don't want to be in conflict with our neighbors and we're putting in tremendous time and effort and money to address neighbors' requests to the point that nothing we can do to make the project viable. if you can see the plans is not to build a luxury home, to indulge ourselves, but simply to be the family of two parents and four children, so we can grow as a family and raise our children in the family and maybe we can finally give our children the dog they wanted for so many years because as a renter, you cannot even have a pet. this has been an emotionally and financially draining process for us. i just hope and i trust the commissioners can judge our case by the facts, and assure us when we followed the requirements, followed the rules, followed the process, did everything that we could, that there is an end to this and there is a justice to the end. and the process is not being abused. thank you is all for me. thank you. i really appreciate you staying so late and taking this case. we have been waiting this for days. >> thank you. any other speakers in favor of th
is water loss. melosi: because it's not a catastrophic issue, we don't think much about it. but there is a 10%, 20%, 30% water loss or leakage in some systems. allbee: already treated water that you've invested money in, you're losing before you actually delivered it. narrator: so many utilities are employing the business strategy of asset management. it's a paradigm shift in the approach of attaining a sustainable water infrastructure. man: it's not construction of new pipelines. we are talking about maintaining, sustaining the infrastructure we have. you've got to know what you have, where it is, what condition it's in, and how long you can expect it to last. melosi: we have very little choice because we've invested in a system that cannot be readily changed. we don't leave a lot of flexibility to dig that all up and replace it with something else. sinha: so we have to also teach our students, the workforce, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it'
nice shirt. nice jacket. >> but you hate it. >> and i hate it or maybe i don't. i'm giving a complement. the thing is facebook inc. doesn't know the context but now we have a system in place and i can resolve to anne and anne could say "i didn't mean to post that photo in an inappropriate way. i'm going to take it down" and we survey the people and everyone feels good about the situation and traditionally we thought it was a case of bullying and two people -- >> misunderstanding. >> there was a misunderstanding so i wanted to point that out and we have this new social resolution thing and a great way to solve problems at a scale of hundreds of millions of people and it's quite awesome to see that unfold, and the last thing i was going to point out in my version of sizzle reel everything we're trying do is create a culture where people speak up for each other and there's a story that i'm going to show you that i think sort of like epitomizes this how do you use social media and the power of friends to create a culture where people stand up for each other? cue up my sizzle
where you could say "hey, i don't like that piece of content" and instead of reporting to facebook ink and we have 3,000 people but we don't understand the context of everything going on. you can report to a family or friend or somebody off the site. >> in the context -- >> in the context of the behavior itself. we have seen the reports go down. the closing of the reports go up and when we surveyed the people both the person reported and the person reporting -- not everyone, but most of the people were very satisfied how it resolved itself. now just think about that. somebody said -- so it's like i say to anne "anne nice shirt. nice jacket. >> but you hate it. >> and i hate it or maybe i don't. i'm giving a complement. the thing is facebook inc. doesn't know the context but now we have a system in place and i can resolve to anne and anne could say "i didn't mean to post that photo in an inappropriate way. i'm going to take it down" and we survey the people and everyone feels good about the situation and traditionally we thought it was a case of bullying and two people -- >> mis
to go that way. okay, you want to go my way. 1, 2, 3. >> okay, why don't you stop. >> 1, 2, 3. >> make sure your back is straight. >> basically when you are using a ladder out there, make sure you keep the ladder 10 feet away from wires. make sure the ladder is secure, that it's on stable ground, that it's even. if it's on a hill, we really don't want you to use it on a hill, but if it's on a hill, make sure it's shimmieed with something stable. make sure it's at the right angle, we suggest 70 degrees. if you stick your hand on a rung, the angle of the ladder is about the right angle there. never let go of the ladder. stand in the center, climb straight up. if you climb on the edges of the rung, the ladder will go this way. look up so you know where you are going and you can see where you're going to climb. walk vertically. don't step off to the side of the ladder. kind of common sense. make sure you read chapter 7 through the . >> this class is managing a disaster. what happens and how do we fit in? emergency operation plan, everything is going to go through the mayor. you have the of
, for that wonderful introduction and i don't know where you got the ease of coming to the mayor's ofrs, there was no ease on that. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for joining together here at the presidio with all the different agencies. i see phil ginsburg, i know bill is around, others from our da office, richard caranza and others from the women's status as well and the district attorneys from the various counties, the school administrators and instructors and superintendents from other counties as well, as well as our community-based agencies that are so invaluable it all of us. this is a very important topic and it's one that our u.s. attorney, melinda hague and i helped spearhead yesterday with 800 students who came together who watch an incredible film by lee hirsch i've heard the wonderful reports from the kids, seen their laughter and their tears. we are going to honor your making that film by doing what we need to do to stop bullying across the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do an
to be making a film on working with school resource officers and how to work with students. we don't believe we should even call anyone a bully because once you get labeled it stays with you. i've gotten letters saying there's a bully in my kid's first grade. the statistics show that about a third of the kids are bullied and bully others. as one kid said, i wanted to man up and show i wasn't going to be bullied so i did it to anyone else. breaking that cycle is going to be exciting and it's exciting to hear that restoretive justice isn't just on the fringe, that whole school districts are taking them on. it's going to be a process to do that because part of the anti-bullying movement is you go online, you see stomp out the bully, get the bully. it's important we all kind of take a stand on that. we all need to learn how to treat each other and change our behaviors. >> thanks, becky, unfortunately that is in in terms of questions because i hate to be the person to stand between you and lunch. we will take about a 20-minute break, you should all be back in your seats by about 12.20, if yo
of conversations before. at this point i don't think that we're ready to take up this project. i think that there is a lot of work to be done. the adjacent buildings points out a lot of problems and mr. schoolneck pointed out things are moving, but there are things to be done. i don't think you can necessarily arrive at a quick resolution after so much time and effort has been put insofar. it's a shame that a lawsuit is what was required for the project sponsor to work the community. i think this seems to be heading in the right direction, but it's certainly not there. i think there is a lot more dialogue that needs to happen between the developer and the community. i don't think there is an urgent need for us to take this up in the immediate future. i recognize that the termination of this might be a different project, but it's fundamentally still a market-rate housing project of similar type and scope. so i can understand why people could feel that we should wait a year on this. more than anything, i just want to encourage the developer to continue to work with the community and to
number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just hey, go do this. we want to keep track of it. if they don't come back within a couple hours we have to send somebody to find them or at least checkup on them. if we don't know where they went and who they are, you have chaos. they might be hurt and they're going to stay hurt. we're going to roll on to disaster psychology. what does that mean? when people go through a disaster, their lives are wrecked. i saw this firsthand, i went down to help out with katrina thing in september. it's weird. because you are dealing with people that lost everything and it's kind of hard to imagine that if you haven't done it yourself. basically, you know, she's looking at her curtains here, she probably hand-stitched those things. maybe they have been hanging there the last 5 or 6 years. everything in the house is wrecked, photos, keepsakes, it's a tough thing. and people deal with this kind of stress in different ways. we as disaster workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use, professional. we try
will be here for any questions. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> why don't we take a few clarifying questions first or public comment? >> public comment. >> let's take public comment on this item. seeing none, public comment is closed >>> commissioner antonini. >> thank you, i had a couple of questions on the memo. and i am led to believe when i first saw this, i thought it was the entire program. but this is only a memo dealing with the resale of existing ownership units and then dealing with the other entities here. for example, as i recall unless it's changed, your for-sale ownership units are 100 ami and it can be up to 120 in some instances, but i believe it's always been at 100 ami has been the price for-sale units. and then the rental units at 60 ami? >> that is correct, but there has been adjustment. there are two ami tables that we use in san francisco. there is a tri-county, or three county ami table. at one point the board of supervisors directed us to use a san francisco-specific table and given the relative wealth of our adjacent counties to the south and north, san francisc
to our neighbors that probably don't know this is happening yet. i feel that it is -- i have owned a number of buildings in the city by the way and still do. i feel that it's unfair for a building owner to be able to increase the value of his or her property while decreasing the value of others. thank you. i am sorry it's been so late. thanks. >> my name is adrian coley and i too reside at 1824 jackson street. i submitted an extensive letter that is part of your package. i do support everything that has been said by my neighbors and i want to touch on a couple of points that have been raised today. one the lawyer mentioned the fact -- he describes pacific avenue there as being a bunch of tall buildings. well, he seemed to conveniently forget that the building next door to this building, 1856 pacific, is an historic, old, beautifully restored home and the result of this elevation is the roof -- the extension, the penthouse will exceed considerably the roof ridgeline of this victorian mansion. so that is affecting an old, beautiful, old building at the 50' height and has been t
stop putting behind bars? who is the people who really don't belong there? it's people whose only offense is possession of a substance to put in their own body, right? that's the first group that needs to be let out. [applause] >> marty, let me ask you, you're obviously part of the california district attorney's association, as we were talking before the panel began, you shared with me that your organization has previously supported a measure that mark leno brought forward to lower the punishment for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana to a misdemeanor to an infraction. in this case your organization is essentially opposed to it. what do you say to mr. adelman and mr. gascon? >> i think one of the things i want to point out is that in terms of the changes currently taking place in california's criminal justice system is that we have embarked on a very, very large experiment and that's called realignment. prison population in california is going to approach by -- or sometime next year the federal mandate of 130,000. we've already released some 50,000 individuals to serve
. >> >> [applause] >> thank you and thank you to our hud partners and at this moment i know i don't need to introduce him. i want to present to all of you mayor edwin lee. >> thank you henry and thank you deputy administrator henry for being here today. two fantastic planning grants from hud as part of a intense national competition and the reason we got this nod is the people decided they're going to come together and get this done. this is a choice. this is a choice that we made with our residents here that we're going to better ourselves. we're going to lift ourselves up. we're going to do it together. that's what it means. that's why the housing authority is here because they believe in the same thing. i want to thank the commissioners and staff and henry a fantastic job and all the leadership with all of the commissioners. i want to thank our partners. let 300,000 grants and they reflect the deputy administrator a collaboration and agreement that we're doing it the right way, and i want to thank president obama. he has been wonderfully supportive of the examples we provided
and then worked here, i have this exposure to diesel smell that you don't notice it here, i do notice it frequently, and so when you mention this gal rachel. >> so, just before this, we had a meeting because we're working on hopefully building a study to look at exposures among women in the fire course to understand what they're exposed to, this raises a really interesting kind of unique sub population within that, she is an environmental health scientist and has done a lot of work on measuring levels of chemicals in people and environments, so one study she did was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels,
never been meet the minimum standards for have the ability. they don't. i have been in hundreds of these units. i don't think i have ever in my experience been in a unit that was built without permits that neat -- meets the requirements of the building code, not once. what we have is a double standard of have the ability here. people who meet the code is live on the standards we have agreed upon. people live in units that are not permitted have some lower standard of have the ability. >> it is. i think it is. the tenants pay their own rent, too. >> thank you. i wanted to add my two cents. i have legalized dozens of dwelling units, illegal units, for people in san francisco. in the last 10 years, there has been a sea change within the bureaucracy, the building and planning departments, where the attitude has been very proactive in trying to help property owners bring things up to code and to save these old, illegal units, rather than force them to be abandoned. the attitude of the city has really changed a lot and people are more likely to get help from their building inspector r
are the most appropriate, are at the right dose, especially for kids are a lot of times, they don't know how to scale down for a child-size body and the machines may not calibrate or have clear directions on how to make that happen so in our own lives, we can ask our health care provides, are there safer alternative, mri or ultrasounds for doing this test, and then if you have kids and they need a test, ensure and ask questions about the safest dose and if they have machines that can calibrate to kids, and then we have to see these changes with the laws so if fda has proposals out for medical imaging around kids so you know how to downsize a radiation dose for kids who is smaller, their physical size is narrower, and also to make machines more accountable and more clear in how they work. >> [inaudible]. >> it's very low doses but that's an excellent question and i thought somebody would probably ask that. so, the united states preventative services task force in 2009 came out with a proposal to revise guidelines saying that perhaps women aged 40 to 50, there's no cost benefit really for that
the consumers said we don't want those things in our products and the change happened and now they have a plan with timelines and clear transparent goals to get those chemicals out of their products. it might be a little slower than we'd all like as consumers but it's moving in the right direction and getting one major company to move put a lot of pressure on those other companies if they want to maintain their credibility, so we're seeing safer shampoo products, we want to pass laws. >> radiation is the longest and best studied exposure link to breast cancer and what can we do about that, some radiation is naturally occurring, but we know that since 1980, radiation exposures for the average person have doubled and most of that is probably due to a 600 % increase in medical radiation, we're being exposed to a lot more radiation from medical tests, sometimes that's the only option, it's worth that added risk because the alternative is really dangerous sometimes, but we want to ensure those scans and those medical imaging tests are the most appropriate, are at the right dose, especially for kids
. superintendent. >> don't start the clock yet. thanks. again i want to thank everyone for being here this morning and this morning i said "welcome to a sunny day in september" and many of you didn't believe me and i want to thank you all for being here and in my comments at the beginning i spoke of the wonderful experience and having 3,000 opportunities yesterday see "bully" the movie. i spoke of all of the administrators seeing "bully" when they came back from summer break and develop their plans on their campuses here, so i would like to go deeper and talk about a couple of things and before that i appreciate what rosylyn and the previous panel said about the term "bullying" and run the risk of it meaning something generic and meaningless and the word of the day, so let's talk about what it is. it's assault. sometimes it's aggravated assault. it's kidnapping. it's coercion of human rights. it's stalking. these are different pictures when you think about it in those terms. that's what bullying is so in san francisco unified we say we have a zero tolerance for bullying or any kind of ac
recommended that women start mammography at age ao where the benefits really out weigh the risk, you don't have 40 years left in your life span at that point perhaps, you have 30, you're at a less vulnerable stage of life so there are a lot more benefits for life, your breast cancer risks are higher, so you know, the age 40 to 50, there's still a lot of debate about that and women need to discuss this with their own health care providers, but recent research has found that women who are at high risk of breast cancer because of braque of mutation who then screening at earlier and earlier ages may be particularly vulnerable to radiation, so for them, alternatives to radiation based screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we w
in a city like san francisco when maybe you don't have a lot of roof space, but you want to get as much power as you can. this is probably the choice preferred for most homeowners. the second technology which is coming on strong is called thin film. that's really a whole different technology using a lot less material. it's like sprayed or painted on, a different way of producing electricity. this stuff has a lot of potential because it can be used in a lot of different ways. this is a thin film panel here, right here and one of the innovative ways you can use this thing is on thought metal seamed roofs. they have an add he'sive backing on and they can stick down on the roof without penetrating the roof. it's a very effective and cheap and safe installation process. thin film has a smaller, a lesser efficiency. half as efficient but it's about half the cost. so if you look at it, a small system 1.2 kilowatt systems, it produces 1.2 kill what's in full sun or 1,200 watts. in crystal lynn it could would take 500 panels. in thin film it would take this much space. they would produce the sam
that person hang out there. you can get into the most ridiculous conversations with the kid "no, you don't get to sit on the senior bench this year. no you don't. you're 18 and i know you're about to have a petition and a protest and i'm not going to let you sit on the senior position and especially if the child has high social power and they sit where people can see them. it's their place. some are waiting to get on that bench since freshman year, so if they do something inappropriate and don't allow them to participate as a member of the community. that is way worse than a two day suspension and everyone sees. you don't need to blanket it out and no, you don't get to sit on the bench and being creative that way is helpful and another thing i learned from the principal and i was stuck and working with boys and boys are complex and interesting. really complex. i know it doesn't look like it and they really are, so one of the things that boys are really good -- boy aggressors are great at is when they have -- when they go to the principal's office be disciplined when they walk out t
to the diesel dust so they mop down every day, i know they probably sweep it but i don't know if mopping down is what 9 does, i don't know if this is company policy because i haven't been there. it is? okay. >> i have a question. my question is unrelated, talking about -- going back to the radiation and how bad it is for your body, so why do they recommend it as a treatment if someone has had cancer of various sorts? >> kind of because it can be toxic to cells and -- so, if you target it, right, and then you're directing it to those very cancer cells that are growing very rapidly and are in a very focal area, then you are, you know, -- and it's at a higher dose than you're exposed to when you're screening, you're killing those cells and you're stopping their growth, so they're leveraging that particular feature of the radiation just as they do with chemotherapy which is drugs that we won't have to take unless we're needing to kill those cancer cells. >> [inaudible] radiation? >> it is very focused >> even though the [inaudible] i was talking about, if it's focused, why does everybody leave th
. hard to see. also has a parapet on it. deep set windows. even though it has stucco on it, don't be fooled that that's wood up above. it's all brick because it's deep set windows. here we go with part of the roof and the parapet. this is over on (inaudible) street. see where the bricks fell, right on top of a car. there were 5 people in that car. buildings like this, you are nearest, where's the best place to be, do you think? you want to be far away from it? you want to be far away from it initially? yeah. but what if you are not far away from it when it starts happening, are you going to try to outrun it? no. you want to get up close to that building because the bricks have a tendency to fall out, fall straight down. if you'll notice right up next to the building there's not that many bricks. tilt up buildings, premade buildings. they are made on the site. generally speaking, you see warehouses, large expanse buildings are made out of them, usually one story buildings. in other words there's not a story on top. they didn't make their corner connections very well. when they di
to come out of retirement and i want her to help me. i don't think it's realistic. you keep thinking i need to find the restroom. i wasn't listening to the reader on stage. she was talking to 3-20 something women. she back and grabbing at my arm. we need to leave now. why? >> dustin is here and he is with someone and she's cute. >> did he see you? >> no. i can't talk to him i'm a mess. are you sure he's really with her and they are not friends. >> she's hanging all over him and i didn't get to pee. >> let's go, then. we fought our way out the door. i cast the last look with senora it was just as well i hasn't found anything to say. i tried to calm aguilarissa, she schemed in terror. i can't go in there what if kevin is in there with his wife. what if i keep seeing them. >> she leaned on the door of the laundry mat. the asian woman looked at us and resumed folding. your ex's will not be there they are ill literate. >> i bet justin is engaged to that girl. she wiped her eyes with the sleeve of her jacket except for the cancer part. >> i'm never getting married. she sank to the gr
, with the passage of don't ask and don't tell, we have that particular partner going on as well. and so, they are also embraced as far as being part of the, uh, the family as well. and even the veterans administration, i think, is looking very carefully at their definition of family even now, and trying to determine what is the best way to capture those individuals who are, are in a person's life who have an emotional attachment and who are so important for their support. and, i think, the unique circumstances of the past decade at war, in terms of the nature of the conflicts, has also sort of, really pushed that, that issue to the forefront with regard to military members, um, are often married to other military members. so, when you have, um, multiple deployment, sometimes both parents deployed, um, really the definition of who is assuming a lot of these family roles is changing. it can be other members of the community, um, very often it's children that are assuming a lot of the parental responsibilities, if you will, um, in the face of both parents being deployed or one parent being
around the necessary -- desirable. if you get to live in this unit it's desirable, but if you don't, it's a hard thing to argue necessary or desirable for. in fact, i have not seen anyone other than the project sponsor articulate and even then i look at what the staff wrote. there is nothing really compelling in the necessary or desirable space. and views are not protected. i know everyone here knows that. but i do believe that when so many people are being impacted negatively and there is not necessarily a greater benefit that i can see of, other than a really great unit if you happen to live there. you know? i have a hard time, you know -- we allow projects to be built with people's views are blocked and 27 new families or whatever occupying the boycedings, buildings, but this case it's probably the same people living there now and it's not benefiting -- i don't see how it really benefits. while it's code-complying and talking about discretionary review thresholds and looking at necessary/desirable conditional use i have a hard time impacting so many people without a clearer ar
that. he did. so we are talking to senior housing developers with his permission. we don't believe that is going to work because as we presented to you six months ago when you approved the eir, it does not appear to us or and i don't mean to put words in their mouths, but to the planning department in their recommendation on the eir, it does not appear to the planning department that it makes any economic sense or is feasible to reuse the structure there as any kind of residential housing. we tried to do it in 2004. we first spoke to senior housing developers in 2010. we spoke to senior housing developers again. and we are now talking to them again, but we don't see that as feasible. we're runing that course out as we can. the developer has done an unbelievable job of meeting with the community over the last six months. we have met with the community. i speak with members of community on a somewhat regular basis to talk and see if the developer is continuing to move forward. the reports that i get are that he is. we have a system in place now with regard to the building that if som
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 259 (some duplicates have been removed)